Why buy-to-let landlords don’t want one-in-a-million properties

A million buy-to-let homes across the UK could be unfit to live in

A property that is one in a million should make a buy-to-let landlord a hefty profit; but not if it is the one in a million identified by Shelter as being unfit for human habitation. If it is one of these, then you could be in for a rough ride under the new Home (Fitness for Human Habitation) Act 2018 that comes into effect on 20th March 2019.

What is changing on 20th March?

From 20th March, properties in the private rented sector begin to be affected by the new law. If your home is deemed to be unfit for human habitation, your tenant could force you to make repairs or improvements. Worse, you could be forced to pay compensation.

Who does the new law affect?

The new law will eventually be rolled out and affect all properties owned by buy-to-let landlords. However, from 20th March your property must be deemed as fit for human habitation if:

  • It is a new tenancy
  • You are renewing a tenancy
  • The tenancy is a statutory periodic tenancy coming into force on or after 20th March

Is the new law straightforward?

You would like to think the new law would be straightforward, but it isn’t. Sure, there’s a list of defects that could make your property unfit for habitation. Unfortunately, how they are applied also depends on who your tenant is. For example, what might be considered unfit for an elderly and infirm tenant wouldn’t apply to a younger, fitter tenant.

What action should you take?

If you are a good landlord, it’s likely that you won’t fall foul of the law. Your properties will be in good order. You’ll be on top of maintenance and repairs. However, can you be certain that your property doesn’t have a defect that could make them unfit for habitation? When was the last time you inspected your property?

Here’s what we recommend buy-to-let landlords do to comply with the new law going forward:

  • Make sure that the tenant understands their responsibility to report any defects to you promptly
  • Repair any reported defect in a timely manner
  • Make regular property inspections if you don’t already

Right now, though, there is one essential action you must take: consider your property and its current condition. Then ask yourself if it really is fit to be lived in by your current tenant.

Don’t get caught out by the new law. Contact Ezytrac today on

A million buy-to-let homes across the UK could be unfit to live in

A property that is one in a million should make a buy-to-let landlord a hefty profit; but not if it is the one in a million identified by Shelter as being unfit for human habitation. If it is one of these, then you could be in for a rough ride under the new Home (Fitness for Human Habitation) Act 2018 that comes into effect on 20th March 2019.

What is changing on 20th March?

From 20th March, properties in the private rented sector begin to be affected by the new law. If your home is deemed to be unfit for human habitation, your tenant could force you to make repairs or improvements. Worse, you could be forced to pay compensation.

Who does the new law affect?

The new law will eventually be rolled out and affect all properties owned by buy-to-let landlords. However, from 20th March your property must be deemed as fit for human habitation if:

  • It is a new tenancy
  • You are renewing a tenancy
  • The tenancy is a statutory periodic tenancy coming into force on or after 20th March

Is the new law straightforward?

You would like to think the new law would be straightforward, but it isn’t. Sure, there’s a list of defects that could make your property unfit for habitation. Unfortunately, how they are applied also depends on who your tenant is. For example, what might be considered unfit for an elderly and infirm tenant wouldn’t apply to a younger, fitter tenant.

What action should you take?

If you are a good landlord, it’s likely that you won’t fall foul of the law. Your properties will be in good order. You’ll be on top of maintenance and repairs. However, can you be certain that your property doesn’t have a defect that could make them unfit for habitation? When was the last time you inspected your property?

Here’s what we recommend buy-to-let landlords do to comply with the new law going forward:

  • Make sure that the tenant understands their responsibility to report any defects to you promptly
  • Repair any reported defect in a timely manner
  • Make regular property inspections if you don’t already

Right now, though, there is one essential action you must take: consider your property and its current condition. Then ask yourself if it really is fit to be lived in by your current tenant.

Don’t get caught out by the new law. Contact Ezytrac today on +44 0 1522 503 717 and make sure your properties are fit for human habitation.

Please check my OneADay videos on our Ezytrac Facebook Page and Ezytrac LinkedIn Page

Yours in Effortless Property Management,

Michael Hollamby

By |2019-02-20T13:49:34+01:00February 20th, 2019|Landlord lessons, Property Management|0 Comments

About the Author:

Michael has over 26 years of property industry experience having worked my way “up from the bottom of the ladder” and gained first hand experience in administration, negotiation, valuing, marketing, management, business ownership, sales, Lettings, property management, property auction, single office management, multi-office area management and most recently managing an investment property management company offering national coverage from a unique management hub based in my home City of Lincoln. Outside of work he spends his time with his wife and 3 young children and enjoys music having been a drummer in bands since a young age and enjoyed success in recording and session work as well as gigging and touring across Europe in the day!